Toad World® Forums

Bug ''2203334325'' is not a valid integer value


#1

Hi,

In Session Browser - Current Statement - Information, the BUFFER_GETS column has the value 2203334325 and an error popup i shown.
The text below is from the “click here” link in the popup window.

Best Regards
Ulf

EurekaLog 6.0.24

Application:

1.1 Start Date : Tue, 26 Oct 2010 08:25:43 +0200
1.2 Name/Description: Toad.exe - (Toad for Oracle)
1.3 Version Number : 10.6.0.42
1.4 Parameters :
1.5 Compilation Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2010 19:46:16 +0200
1.6 Up Time : 1 day, 6 hours, 8 minutes, 35 seconds

Exception:

2.1 Date : Wed, 27 Oct 2010 14:34:19 +0200
2.2 Address : 00412C2D
2.3 Module Name : Toad.exe - (Toad for Oracle)
2.4 Module Version: 10.6.0.42
2.5 Type : EConvertError
2.6 Message : ‘‘2203334325’’ is not a valid integer value.
2.7 ID : 9FD6
2.8 Count : 1
2.9 Status : New
2.10 Note :

User:

3.1 ID : UMA1
3.2 Name : .
3.3 Email :
3.4 Company : Åhléns AB
3.5 Privileges: SeChangeNotifyPrivilege - ON
SeSecurityPrivilege - OFF
SeBackupPrivilege - OFF
SeRestorePrivilege - OFF
SeSystemtimePrivilege - OFF
SeShutdownPrivilege - OFF
SeRemoteShutdownPrivilege - OFF
SeTakeOwnershipPrivilege - OFF
SeDebugPrivilege - OFF
SeSystemEnvironmentPrivilege - OFF
SeSystemProfilePrivilege - OFF
SeProfileSingleProcessPrivilege - OFF
SeIncreaseBasePriorityPrivilege - OFF
SeLoadDriverPrivilege - ON
SeCreatePagefilePrivilege - OFF
SeIncreaseQuotaPrivilege - OFF
SeUndockPrivilege - ON
SeManageVolumePrivilege - OFF
SeImpersonatePrivilege - ON
SeCreateGlobalPrivilege - ON

Active Controls:

4.1 Form Class : TfrmMain
4.2 Form Text : Toad for Oracle
4.3 Control Class: TcxTreeList
4.4 Control Text :

Computer:

5.1 Name : WS_415
5.2 Total Memory : 2002 Mb
5.3 Free Memory : 682 Mb
5.4 Total Disk : 149,04 Gb
5.5 Free Disk : 109,03 Gb
5.6 System Up Time: 1 day, 6 hours, 15 minutes, 8 seconds
5.7 Processor : Intel® Core™2 Duo CPU E6750 @ 2.66GHz
5.8 Display Mode : 1280 x 1024, 32 bit
5.9 Display DPI : 96
5.10 Video Card : Intel® Q35 Express Chipset Family (driver 6.14.10.4837)
5.11 Printer : ES3640 Pro MFP(PS) (driver 6.0.6000.16386)

Operating System:

6.1 Type : Microsoft Windows XP
6.2 Build # : 2600
6.3 Update : Service Pack 3
6.4 Language: Swedish
6.5 Charset : 0

Network:

7.1 IP Address: 193.235.153.182
7.2 Submask : 255.255.255.000
7.3 Gateway : 193.235.153.001
7.4 DNS 1 : 193.234.206.025
7.5 DNS 2 : 193.234.206.004
7.6 DHCP : ON

Call Stack Information:

|Address |Module |Unit |Class |Procedure/Method |Line |

Running Thread: ID=2436; Priority=-2; Class=; [Main]
01EF1008
01EF0DE0
01EED32F
01EECB70
01EEFC2F
7E3688D5
7C90D328
7E3794DD
7E37B3FC
005782AF
7E3A65B2
7E37B3C6
7E3792DE
7E379130
7E379160
7E3688D5
0056956D
7E37A034
7E37A01E
7E3A65B2
7E37B3FC
7E3794DD
7E3794B3
7E368A0B
7E368A01
022965C2
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Running Thread: ID=3180; Priority=0; Class=TWorkerThread
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
7C90DF58
7C802550
7C80253D
7C802530
009E4205
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Calling Thread: ID=2436; Priority=-2; Class=; [Main]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
01E16E00
01E0AF6E
01E0AEE4
01E0B4BA
01E0B250
01B7644B
01B763FC
01B76078
01B76038
01B73576
01B7434B
0229654B

Modules Information:

Processes Information:

Assembler Information:

Registers:


#2

I guess 31 bits isn’t enough anymore. Why, I remember when all we had was
16 bits….

Nate Schroeder

Enterprise Services - Data Management Team

Monsanto Company

800 N. Lindbergh Blvd. LC4D - Saint Louis, MO - 63167

314-694-2592

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#3

And had to code assembler

in binary

using dip switches

in a blinding blizzard

up hill

both ways!


#4

Oh, you were there too, eh? Ahhh, for the good [?] old days.

Actually, back in the late 1970s I was working with a computer (a PDP-11) where,
if it crashed, we did have to load the bootstrap routine into memory using the
toggle switches on the front panel in order to start it back up. Fortunately the
bootstrap routine was only about 12 words long. (We got a lot of, um, practice
at doing that!)

Nate Schroeder

[TeamBeardIsNoLongerBlack]


#5

Yeah, I’ve been at since 1981, and although that doesn’t seem that long ago, I remember loading the OS from a cassette tape, coding on boxes of punch cards, hazing the newbies with the “bit bucket” under the card reader/punch, hard wiring a collater, decollating multi-part carbon continuous feed paper…

It’s frightening to think that the disk drives back then were four feet deep, a couple feet wide and a couple feet tall and only held 212 meg. Now I can get 2 terrabytes that fit in my pocket for under $100.

And my wrist watch has more power then the IBM 360-30 mainframe I worked on back then. Not to mention my iPhone with 16 gig of memory compared to the 256k on that old monster. And it took half of an 18 wheeler trailer just for the memory core and CPU. Amazing how far we’ve come.


#6

OK, I changed the datatype from Integer to Int64. You should be able to go up
to 18446744073709551615 in the next beta.


#7

Or a billion, gagillion, fafillion, shabolubalu million illion yillion


#8

I remember when all we had was 16 bits….

16 bits… why I was thrilled when we had a 2 bit option available…

Ok, I’m just being facetious, I’m not quite that old :wink:

Roger S.


#9

I believe the technical term for that is “a crapload”


#10

Dilbert and colleagues reminisce:

Or see it here:


2&x=58&y=17

Daniel B Madvig
Computer Technologies

Northwestern College & Northwestern Media
3003 Snelling Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55113
www.nwc.edu

651.631.5323
image001.png


#11

Dilbert and colleagues reminisce:

Or see it here:


2&x=58&y=17

Daniel B Madvig
Computer Technologies

Northwestern College & Northwestern Media
3003 Snelling Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55113
www.nwc.edu

651.631.5323
image001.jpeg


#12

Actually there is some truth in this cartoon. Back in Fortran 66 we did not have
character variables. We had to use something called Hollerith Constants. And yes
– we were doing this on cards, followed by dec-writers (typewriter
connected to computer), followed by line mode terminals, followed by full screen
terminals and then PC’s. Ah the good ole days
image001.jpeg


#13

Actually there is some truth in this cartoon. Back in Fortran 66 we did not have
character variables. We had to use something called Hollerith Constants. And yes
– we were doing this on cards, followed by dec-writers (typewriter
connected to computer), followed by line mode terminals, followed by full screen
terminals and then PC’s. Ah the good ole days
image001.png